Academic Programs and Graduation Requirements

Undergraduate Degrees Offered

Walla Walla University offers courses of study leading to the following undergraduate degrees:

Associate of Science (A.S.)

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.)

Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.)

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.)

Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)

Walla Walla University is a comprehensive institution of higher education offering not only traditional liberal arts and professional programs, but also preprofessional and special two-year associate degree curricula for students who may wish to pursue a terminal program of a vocational nature. For a listing of undergraduate areas of study offered see Areas of Study section as listed in this bulletin. For a listing of graduate areas of study offered see the Graduate Bulletin.

Graduate Degrees

Walla Walla University offers courses of study leading to the following graduate degrees:

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)

Master of Science (M.S.)

Master of Social Work (M.S.W.)

Students desiring information concerning graduate degree requirements (standards of admission, degree candidacy, curricula, etc.) should consult the Graduate Bulletin, which is available from the Marketing and Enrollment Services Office and online.

Teacher Education Program

The Walla Walla University School of Education and Psychology is authorized by the Washington State Board of Education to recommend the residency teachers' credential. Students who plan to enter the teaching profession with a denominational or state teaching credential should become thoroughly acquainted with the certification requirements listed in the Education and Psychology section of this bulletin.

Baccalaureate Degrees

The Bachelor of Arts degree consists of four years of course work that places the student's major field of study in the context of a liberal arts education. To encourage a wide range of studies, the degree requires a greater concentration of general studies courses than do other degrees and a minor in an area distinct from the major, while it allows a greater number of electives. In the tradition of the liberal arts, all Bachelor of Arts degree majors require foreign language study.

The Bachelor of Business Administration degree consists of a four-year program with concentrations available in accounting, entrepreneurship and small business management, finance, international business, management, and marketing. For specific requirements, see the School of Business section of this bulletin.

The Bachelor of Music degree consists of four years of course work primarily in the major field of study with modified requirements in general studies. The degree is offered with a choice of two majors, Performance or Music Education. For the modified general studies program and other specific requirements, see the Music section of this bulletin.

The Bachelor of Science degree consists of four years of course work that places the student's major field of study in the context of a liberal arts education. The degree permits somewhat greater concentration in the field of study and requires fewer general studies courses than does the Bachelor of Arts degree. No foreign language study is required. No minor is required with the exception of Elementary Education.

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree is a four-year program accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org, requiring 200 quarter hours of course work. It is designed to prepare students for entry into the profession of engineering and for lifelong learning including programs of advanced study in civil, computer, electrical and mechanical engineering or associated fields. For the modified general studies program and other specific requirements, see the Engineering section of this bulletin.

The Bachelor of Social Work degree is a four-year program approved by the Council on Social Work Education, the accrediting body for all social work education programs. It prepares students for entry level positions in a variety of social service agencies. For specific requirements, see the Social Work and Sociology section of this bulletin.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

Although general studies are stressed during the first two years of study, students should plan to include certain elementary and intermediate courses in the desired major during the freshman and sophomore years in order to successfully complete the major.

A student who is undecided as to a major field of study may, during the freshman year, explore several fields of knowledge without loss of credit if he/she plans his/her choices with an academic adviser. It is best for a major to be chosen no later than the end of the sophomore year. The selection of a minor (for Bachelor of Arts degree candidates) and appropriate electives must be made in consultation with and approved by the assigned academic adviser.

Candidates are expected to be fully informed concerning degree requirements and are responsible for their fulfillment. Students shall have the option of meeting degree requirements as published in the bulletin at the time of initial registration or any bulletin published while in regular attendance. Those missing regular attendance for one full school year (except for Christian Service Volunteers) must meet the requirements of the current bulletin upon resuming attendance. Candidates for degree completion must submit a signed Application for Degree (Senior Outline) and a signed Graduation Contract to the Academic Records Office three quarters before graduation. Students who have submitted a formal application for a degree (Senior outline) to the Academic Records Office and do not graduate will be allowed only one year after the last date of enrollment to complete all degree requirements under the bulletin specified on the approved Senior outline; otherwise the current bulletin requirements must be met.

Undergraduate students who marched, or were approved to march in the June Commencement, but have not completed degree requirements, must register for GNRL 401. A fee will be charged each quarter, except summer, for up to two years after the proposed graduation date or until all requirements are met and the degree is posted. See Financial Bulletin.

Degrees are conferred and diplomas issued each quarter. All course work must be completed, transcripts received, comprehensives taken and acceptable grades received before the degree will be awarded.

Degree conferral dates for the 2014-2015 school year are:

Autumn December 30, 2016
Winter March 24, 2017
Spring June 11, 2017
Summer August 25, 2017

Commencement Exercises

Commencement exercises are held once a year in June. Students who have completed their requirements Summer, Autumn, Winter, or Spring quarter may participate in the following June commencement exercises. Those anticipating the completion of an approved degree program during the upcoming summer must complete a Petition to Participate in Commencement with Deferred Courses to participate in the current June graduation exercises.

By Thursday prior to the June graduation date, prospective summer degree candidates must have satisfied the following:

  1. Approved degree application (Senior Outline) on file in the Academic Records office showing a completion date for summer.
  2. Approved by Academic Records to participate in Commencement with deferred courses.
  3. Financial clearance for the completion of summer course work.
  4. Registered for all remaining WWU coursework.
  5. All transfer transcripts on file in the Academic Records office.
  6. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 for university work.
  7. No more than twelve (12) credits to complete after spring quarter, including summer courses and outstanding “I”s and “IP”s.
  8. Remaining credits must meet residency requirements.

Any exceptions to the above requirements must be approved by Academic Standards Committee.

Graduations in Absentia:

Degree candidates are expected to participate in the yearly graduation ceremonies. A senior wishing not to participate should apply to the President's Office to graduate in absentia.

Residency Requirements:

  1. A minimum of 25% of the credits in each major and minor must be Walla Walla University credits.
  2. A minimum of 9 upper-division credits in the major and 3 upper-division credits in the minor must be Walla Walla University credits.
  3. At least 40 of the last 45 credits before degree completion must be Walla Walla University credits.

General Requirements:

  1. Credits required. Successful completion of a minimum of 192 quarter hours (200 quarter hours, Bachelor of Science in Engineering), including 60 quarter hours in courses numbered 300 or above, and a cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 or above in the major, minor, and overall.
  2. Major. The completion of a major field of departmental specialization (minimum of 45 quarter hours and a cumulative grade-point average of 2.00). A grade lower than C- will not apply toward a major except in engineering (see Engineering section of this bulletin). At least 21 quarter hours in the major must be numbered 300 or above. Unless otherwise specified all electives applied to the major must be courses offered by the major department. A course may fulfill requirements for more than one major unless otherwise stated. A course may satisfy a cognate requirement of a major while simultaneously being counted toward the credit requirement of another major, minor, or concentration.
  3. Double Majors. Students taking double majors must meet all the degree requirements for each major, including the general studies programs. Majors must be completed within the degrees under which they are described in this bulletin. (BA majors can serve as second majors only under a BA degree, BS majors can serve as second majors only under a BS degree; the BBA, BMus, BSE and BSW degrees cannot have second majors.
  4. Minor. Bachelor of Arts degrees require the completion of a minor of at least 27 quarter hours and a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.00, or completion of an Associate of Science degree, provided it is in an area distinct from the major. Three quarter hours must be courses numbered 300 or above. A grade lower than C- will not apply toward a minor. A course may satisfy content requirements for several majors or minors but credit will apply to only one. Unless otherwise specified all electives applied to the minor must be courses offered by the minor department. A cognate course may satisfy the cognate requirements of a major while simultaneously being counted toward the credit requirement of another major, minor, or concentration.
  5. General Studies Requirements. The completion of the general studies requirements as specified for the type of degree sought detailed in the following section (84 quarter hours for the Bachelor of Arts and 72 quarter hours for the Bachelor of Science degree).
  6. Candidacy for Degree. Degree candidates must file a formal application (Senior outline) for a degree, showing the proposed schedule of courses for the senior year, with the Registrar not later than one week after the beginning of the first quarter of the senior year. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the Academic Records Office. Students are not considered candidates for degrees or eligible for senior class membership until officially notified by the Registrar that their senior outlines have been approved.
  7. Senior Class. Candidates for degrees must be members of the senior class. The fee is fixed by the class and approved by the President of the University.
  8. Comprehensive Examinations. A comprehensive examination is required for each major before a degree may be conferred. For some majors, the Major Field Test (MFT) is used, and for others, the Graduate Record General and/or Subject Exam is used as the comprehensive. Elementary Education majors are required to pass the Washington Educator Skills Test-Endorsement for Elementary Education: Content Knowledge (WEST-E Elementary). There are also some departments/schools who provide a comprehensive exam and/or project. The bulletin details those requirements under the appropriate department.

    The General Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is now available only by computer, usually at Sylvan Technology centers in metropolitan areas. Information regarding registration for the General GRE is available at the center.

    Students whose majors require the Subject GRE must pick up registration materials in the test center. These materials must be mailed at least nine weeks prior to the test date. Please note that there are only three times that the subject exams are administered and the dates are fixed by the test company and cannot be changed. Non-sabbath testing is of course available on campus but strict instructions must be followed.

  9. Transcripts and Correspondence Work. Seniors must have all transfer transcripts on file in the Academic Records Office by the 10th day of Spring quarter to be eligible to participate in June commencement exercises.
  10. Second Baccalaureate Degree. Two baccalaureate degrees with majors from different disciplines may be conferred concurrently or sequentially if the candidate has met the requirements of both degrees and has spent a minimum of of 40 of their last 45 credits in residence. See requirements 2 and 3 regarding majors.
  11. Applied Music Credit Applicable Toward Baccalaureate Degree. Not more than 9 quarter hours in applied music (including 3 quarter hours of Ensemble) may be earned toward a baccalaureate degree without an equal number of quarter hours in music courses with prefixes MUCT, MUED or MUHL. Additional hours in applied music may include ensemble hours without restrictions.

Associate Degree Requirements

The two-year associate degree programs are intended to provide accredited technological and occupational preparation for students desiring to graduate with marketable skills while experiencing the full benefits of a residential Christian college.

Candidates are expected to be fully informed concerning degree requirements and are responsible for their fulfillment. Students shall have the option of meeting degree requirements as published in the bulletin at the time of initial registration or any bulletin published while in regular attendance. Those missing regular attendance for one full school year (except for Student Missionaries and Task Force workers) must meet the requirements of the current bulletin upon resuming attendance.

Graduation Requirements for the Associate Degree

All candidates for the associate degree must complete the following residence and general requirements:

Residency Requirements:

A minimum of 24 quarter hours. The last two quarters must be completed in residence, including a minimum of 9 quarter hours earned in the concentration.

General Requirements:

  1. A minimum of 96 quarter hours must be completed.
  2. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 (C) is required. A grade lower than C- will not apply toward the concentration.
  3. The associate degree concentration as outlined under the respective departments of instruction of this bulletin must be completed.
  4. The general studies requirements as outlined below must be completed. For a listing of the courses which may apply to the requirements, see Specific Courses for General Studies section of this Bulletin.
  5. A course may fulfill requirements for one or more concentrations but credit will apply to only one concentration.
  6. Students must have all transcripts for correspondence and transfer credit on file in the Academic Records Office two weeks prior to graduation. All correspondence work must be completed prior to the beginning of the last quarter in residence.
  7. Degree candidates must file a formal application (Senior Outline) for a degree showing the proposed schedule of courses for the senior year with the Registrar not later than one week after the beginning of the first quarter of the senior year. Appropriate forms may be obtained from the Academic Records Office. Students are not considered candidates for degrees and are not eligible for senior class membership until officially notified by the Registrar that their senior outlines have been approved.

Student Responsibility for Meeting Degree Requirements

While your adviser may assist you in planning a program, degree candidates are expected to be fully informed concerning degree requirements and are responsible for their fulfillment. The following checklist will help you in meeting graduation requirements at WWU. You may use this page to check the requirements off as you meet them. Please see the Academic Programs and Graduation Requirements section and the departmental sections of the university bulletin for further explanations of these requirements.

Checklist for Meeting Degree Requirements

___ General studies requirements:

See General Studies section of bulletin for specifics.

84 hours for B.A. degrees

72 hours for B.B.A., B.S., or B.S.W. degrees

B.Mus. and B.S.E. degrees (see degree requirements)

32 hours for A.S. degrees

___ Total hours required:

192 quarter hours for bachelor's degrees (exception: 200 for the B.S.E. degree)

96 credits must be from four-year colleges or universities

96 quarter hours for associate degrees

___ Upper-division credits:

60 quarter hours required for bachelor's degrees including:

a minimum of 21 quarter hours in the major

a minimum of 3 quarter hours in the minor

___ Transfer credits:

Transcripts for all off-campus credits need to be on file in the Records Office. Before taking courses off-campus it is advisable to check with your academic adviser and the Records Office to be sure the credits satisfy requirements needed.

___ Residency requirements:

At least 40 of last 45 credits must be on campus.

25% of major credits (including 9 upper-division) must be on campus.

25% of minor credits (including 3 upper-division) must be on campus.

___ Foreign language requirement:

The B.A. degree requires 8-12 credits of one foreign language.

___ Minimum acceptable grade in major or minor:

No grade lower than a C- (1.70) is acceptable in a major or minor.

Exceptions:

Nursing and Education major minimum = C (2.00)

Engineering (see B.S.E. section of the bulletin)

___ GPA requirements:

Major or minor GPA: minimum of 2.00 in each major/minor

Cumulative GPA: minimum of 2.00

Exceptions: Education majors, 2.75; Nursing majors, 2.50

___ Comprehensive exams:

A comprehensive exam is required for most majors. See departmental adviser or the counseling center for specific requirement.

___ Application for Degree (Senior Outline):

File form with the Records Office three quarters before graduation.

Form must be approved by the Records Office before you are eligible to graduate.

General Studies Mission

The purpose of the Walla Walla University general studies program is to provide a balanced education that supports the institution's core themes: excellence in thought, generosity in service, beauty in expression, and faith in God. The general studies curriculum is broad in scope, covering major intellectual or aesthetic ideas or methods across various disciplines. Students completing the general studies program at Walla Walla University will be able to:

  • Demonstrate critical and reflective thinking
  • Exhibit logical and quantitative reasoning
  • Communicate effectively and responsibly
  • Articulate a Christian worldview

In addition to providing breadth of knowledge and the development of skills for greater depth of study, the general studies program seeks to prepare students for “responsible citizenship, generous service, a deep respect for the beauty in God’s creation, and the promise of re-creation through Jesus Christ.” (WWU mission)

Outline of General Studies Requirements:

Bachelor of Arts Degree 84 quarter hours
(including foreign language)
Bachelor of Business Administration Degree 72 quarter hours
Bachelor of Music Degree *
Bachelor of Science Degree 72 quarter hours
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree *
Bachelor of Social Work Degree 72 quarter hours
Associate of Science Degree 32 quarter hours

* These degrees have modified general studies requirements. Please refer to the respective departments of instruction in this bulletin.

For the Honors General Studies Program, see the Honors General Studies section of this bulletin.

General Studies - Specific Required Courses

The range of hours for each area below indicates the minimum number of hours that must be chosen from that area and the maximum number of hours from that area that may count toward the total requirement. Some areas are subdivided, with ranges from each subdivision indicating the minimum that must be taken from that subdivision and the maximum that may count toward that area requirement. Credits earned beyond the listed maximum may be counted as general electives.

Engineering majors should consult the engineering section for general studies requirements.

General Studies Requirements for the Associate Degree

Select a minimum of 32 quarter hours from the following areas:

Hours Min/Max
Health and Physical Education 0-2
History 0-4
Social Science 0-4
Humanities 0-8
Language Arts 9-13
Required: ENGL 121, ENGL 122, ENGL 223
Mathematics 0-4
Natural Science 0-4
Religion and Theology 8
Biblical Studies, 4-8 hours
Electives in Religion or Theology, 0-4 hours

Honors General Studies Program

The Honors General Studies Program offers a group of interdisciplinary courses stressing independent research, writing, and discussion.

This program is a separate track of general studies and not a major or a minor in itself. Honors core courses have a flavor distinctly different from the regular general studies courses because they use primary source material more extensively than textbooks to enhance the development of independent thinking. Honors core courses follow an interdisciplinary approach that stresses the unity of knowledge. The classes are more personalized and typically smaller than other general studies classes. Some courses are team taught.

Students in the Honors Program are awarded an annual scholarship dependent on successful completion of specific courses and a minimum GPA. See the Honors Program Director for specific details and scholarship amounts. At graduation, students who complete the Honors Program requirements with at least a 3.25 cumulative GPA and a 3.0 GPA in honors core courses and honors core cognates, will be designated as "Honors General Studies Graduates."

Admission Requirements. The Honors Admissions Committee considers high school GPA, standardized test scores, an essay submitted by the student as part of the application, and on occasion, personal interviews with applicants and recommendations from teachers. It is advantageous for applicants to have completed Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate course work and other enriched offerings in high school. Students already enrolled in the University may apply to the program or petition the Honors Program director to enroll in a specific Honors course.

Program Requirements. Students whose grades fall below a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or an Honors core/cognate GPA of 2.75 for two consecutive quarters will be dropped from the program. Honors students must complete the honors core courses and a selection of other general studies courses as listed below.

Course Numbering

The course numbering sequence is designed to reflect in varying degrees a progression in course content, level of approach, and breadth of coverage. The course description further delineates specific course content progression. This information provided by the course number, prefix, and description should serve as a general guide to students in selecting courses compatible with their background and ability.

In general, the following guidelines have been used in course numbering:

The first numeral indicates academic level of the course:

001-100 Remedial and Experiential courses (credits do not apply toward graduation, but do apply to financial aid minimums.)

101-199 Courses normally taken during the freshman year

200-299 Courses normally taken during the sophomore year

300-399 Courses normally taken during the junior year

400-499 Courses normally taken during the senior year

Courses in which the third numeral is 1, 2, or 3, must be taken in sequence. In sequences the earlier courses are prerequisites to the later courses and must be successfully completed prior to enrolling in a subsequent course.

The credit indicated in connection with a course is the “quarter hour,” and one quarter hour represents one recitation period per week for one quarter or three clock hours of laboratory work.

The University will make every effort consistently to offer all courses at appropriate intervals. It does reserve the right, however, to alter the sequences or drop courses if unforeseen circumstances in class enrollments or teacher staffing so dictate. The Class Schedule should be consulted for personal planning of course loads and schedules.

The University reserves the right to withdraw temporarily any course which does not have an adequate enrollment. A course may not be offered for fewer than six students except for seniors or graduate students.

Some courses specify that they are offered odd or even years only. A school year (Fall to Summer) is designated “odd" or "even” by the beginning year of Fall Quarter.

Uniform Course Numbers

By general agreement certain course numbers are reserved for classes that are of such a general nature as to be found in many departments. The prefix assigned to the number designates the discipline. The following are courses that carry uniform numbers throughout this bulletin:

001-100 REMEDIAL COURSES (1-4)

Courses for students needing to improve basic skills in preparation for university-level work. Credit will not apply toward graduation, but will apply to financial aid minimums and for deferment of educational loans.

100 EXPERIENTIAL PROGRAM (6; 18)

Program with qualified supervision and structured experience including Christian Service Volunteer, Task Force and Cooperative Education. Credit will not apply toward graduation or class level requirements, but will apply for deferment of educational loans. Graded S or NC.

198, 398 TRANSFER CREDITS

Numbering used for the articulation of lower and upper division transfer courses that do not have a WWU equivalent, but can be used to meet general studies requirements. These numbers will be used only within the Academic Records Office.

199, 399 TRANSFER CREDITS

Numbering used for the articulation of lower and upper division transfer courses that do not have a WWU equivalent, but can be used as electives in the major or minor. These numbers will be used only within the Academic Records Office.

200; 400 TOPICS (1-5; 10)

Courses in specialized or experimental areas on either the lower division or advanced level. These courses are conducted through regular class activities and are approved by the Curriculum Committee as a one-time offering. See the Class Schedule for all approved topics courses.

259; 459 SUPPLEMENTAL STUDIES (1-3; 3)

Previous course work supplemented when portions of a course required in the student's program have been omitted. Ordinarily supplementation will occur only with transfer students or within a program that has undergone a major curriculum change. A study proposal is to be outlined in consultation with the instructor of the course being supplemented and approved by the department and the Academic Standards Committee. May not be substituted for existing courses.

274; 474 WORKSHOPS/STUDY TOURS (1-4)

Short-term, concentrated experiences which require a minimum of out-of-class assignments and are usually conducted in large blocks of time. See the class schedule for all approved workshop/study tour courses.

280; 370; 490 DIRECTED FIELD WORK/PRACTICUM/ EXPERIENCE (2-16)

392 GENERAL SECONDARY METHODS COURSE (See Education) (2)

394 DIRECTED READING (1-3)

Independent reading for students who wish to broaden their knowledge in a particular discipline.

395; 396 DEPARTMENTAL METHODS COURSES (3)

469 ADVANCED STUDY (1-3; 3)

Advanced directed study by which students may enhance the major or minor in breadth or depth in topics not covered by the department curriculum. The study proposal must be approved by the department faculty and the Academic Standards Committee and should indicate the methods of evaluation. May not be substituted for existing courses in the major or minor.

478 APPLIED RESEARCH (1-3; 4)

Student will work with a departmental adviser on research activities such as literature search, preliminary experiments, data collection, data transcription, or data analysis. Graded S/NC.

479 DIRECTED RESEARCH/PROJECT (1-3; 6)

Individual research, and/or laboratory work, or technical project in the major. (Some departments may allow this course on the minor.) A project proposal is required to define the scope of the work and the method of reporting. Requires permission of the department faculty with a copy of the proposal sent to the Registrar in the Academic Records office. See individual departments for specific course description.

490 INTERNSHIP (0-12; 12)

Individual contract arrangement involving students, faculty, cooperative businesses and organizations to gain experience in a work environment. Allows the student to apply advanced classroom learning.  A minimum of 30 hours of approved activity/experience must be completed for each credit earned. See individual departments for specific course description and Internship Program in the Nondepartmental section of the Bulletin for other details.   Prerequisite: Approval by department. Graded S or NC.  (Course fees apply for students enrolled for 0 credit.)

495 COLLOQUIUM (0)

Series of lectures, programs, discussions or other activities designed to explore specific issues in a given field of study. For each quarter that a student fails to complete the colloquium requirement as stated for the major, there will be a fee to be paid before an alternative colloquium will be approved. Graded S or NC.

496; 497; 498 SEMINAR (1-4)